Deborah Cox: ‘Kinda Miss You’ Single Review

Deco Entertainment
Deco Entertainment

“Kinda Miss You,” the first single from Deborah Cox’s upcoming album, which is scheduled for later this year, is ready for its close-up in the spotlight. Given today’s current fad on pop radio, this hit is undoubtedly flawless. Cox is ready to cause a massive attack on the radio with this fantastic electric pop ballad, which is reminiscent of the hugely successful song, “Latch,” from artists Disclosure and Sam Smith. Surely, fans remained hopeful for an R&B ballad of “Nobody’s Supposed To Here,” but it is a welcomed surprise to witness the vocal supreme release a song that could garner massive success on a worldwide level.

Cox gives a stunning subdued vocal suited for pop and rhythmic radio, which enhances the pop record in a colossal way. It’s an effortlessly relentless verse, “You lied when /  I knew the truth / But still / I gave it to you / When I knew / I shouldn’t / stay with you / That’s something emotions will do.” The lyrics are engaging because they are flattering to the theme – kind of missing a past love.

After listening to this record, it will magically conjure up those feelings about a past love who is truly missed, and hopefully, it is not too late to make up. Producers Khristopher Riddick-Tynes and Leon Thomas of The Rascals bring a fun and intelligent playfulness to “Kinda Miss You.” It is a very good thing when producers can transform a love ballad into an exhilarating dance floor anthem. The chorus is infectious, “I Kinda Miss You / But I Don’t Know why / Cause being with you was / Like do or die / I can’t let you go / You’re stuck to my soul / Now tell me why.”

As a single, “Kinda Miss You” is the supreme choice to bring this dynamic vocalist back into the masses with a record, worthy of worldwide success. Promotion and performances will be the momentum needed for raising awareness of the song’s arrival. Hopefully, her new management team is aware of the guaranteed success this single deserves. A trendy vocal from Cox multiplies the song’s future prominence for universal appeal.