Bring it Back: 11 Decades of Men’s Hair Trends

Men’s hair has taken a turn for the retro lately, and we’re here to take a look at all the great throwback styles reappearing in the current day. From the 1910s to the present day, men’s hair styles have evolved with the trends of their time. The following styles are eleven male hairdo’s; some of which we’d love to see back in the trend circle, and others that should stay buried in history.

Number Eleven: The Clark Gable – 1910s.

A classic look, for the classic man. Clark Gable popularized this debonair cut with his part in Gone with the Wind. The token aspects of this style are its volume with the incorporation of the slicked-back styles, as well as the waves in the side. It would only be complete with a center-parted mustache, of course.

Number Ten: The Aristocrat – 1920s.

The roaring twenties were an inspirational decade for men’s hair; however, one sinful style seemed to prevail over the others. “The Aristocrat”, known for its middle parting, gained popularity for servicemen and aristocrats alike. A classy look for a classy age; however, I don’t believe we will be seeing this one in person again anytime soon.

Number Nine: The City-Slick – 1930s.

We believe the hair styles in the thirties were determined greatly by how much gel you could slather into your locks. Hair gel for men caught on quickly, and there were many cheaper substitutes before hair products gained diversity. While we can only imagine how… well, crunchy men’s hair was in this decade, we have to admit that they do look rather handsome.

Number Eight: The Playboy – 1940s.

The forties took the gelled styles of the thirties and added a more natural (sort of) touch. Rather than gelled, combed straight hair, waves became the new look of the age. Waves or straight, both are winning looks in our books.

Number Seven: The Greaser – 1950s.

The dark day soon came where hair gel became expensive and scarce, bringing a creative approach to the hair game. Young men in the fifties began throwing on layers of car grease into their hair as a substitute for gel. Thus, beginning the age of the greasers.

Number Six: The Bowl Cut – 1960s.

When the Beatles hit America, they brought with them their iconic “bowl cut”. As the band got bigger and bigger, idolizing young people (including women) began wearing it dry, straight, and rounded.

Number Five: The Hippie – 1970s.

The decade of peace, love, and rock and roll inspired men to “let it grow, man.” It was a more natural approach to men’s hair styling (or lack thereof) to fit the spirit of the decade. We miss the day that it was acceptable for men to wear hair accessories like they used to, as this was also the decade that headbands took center-stage.

Number Four: The Afro – 1980s.

With years as wild and ridiculous as the eighties, the corresponding hairstyle of the decade had to fit the part. Neon colors brightened the streets, and afros cursed the heads of many. This decade was a gruesome set of years for hair, as this decade also birthed the dreaded mullet: business in the front, party in the back.

Number Three: The Spikes – 1990s.

The nineties were all about spikes, spikes, and more spikes. Pointy tips, colorful dyed accents, gelled curls; anything to accentuate each individual lock of hair. We’re not sure where this trend originated from (other than boy bands), but we feel like it might have something to do with anime obsessions.

Number Two: The Faux Hawk – 2000s.

The gelled spikes later evolved into a more relaxed spiky style, the infamous faux-hawk. Of all our hairstyle trends for men over the decades, this is arguably the most controversial. Either you love them or hate them, there really seems to be no middle ground. However, they are still to this day one of the most common styles for men and are supported by the Tampa Bay Rays.

Number One: The Man-Bun – 2010s.

The man-bun came with a handful of criticisms as it debuted, however halfway into the 2010s it has become one of the most popular men’s styles. It’s great for men: easy to grow, easy to keep. The man-bun has gained popularity ridiculously quickly and is working its way into the hearts of skeptical women. We women do seem to love our rugged, hairy men with low-maintenance attitude.