Slip ‘N Slide: The World’s 6 Most Spectacular Waterfalls

As great as they were, this would be the perfect time to not listen to TLC. Chasing waterfalls is probably one of the most adventurous experiences you could ever have. There’s nothing better than being in the outdoors, experiencing the fresh air and peaceful solitude of these beautiful locations. Waterfalls are some of the most gorgeous things to witness, and they happen to be all over the world. Aside from the most obvious waterfall that most people immediately identify with, taking a trip to China and New Zealand will let you bask in the glory of some of the best channels of water flowing over vertical drops. Here’s our list of the world’s six most spectacular waterfalls.

Number 6: Ban Gioc–Detian Falls, border between China and Vietnam. Ban Gioc–Detian Falls is a hyphenated name for what are technically two waterfalls on the Quây Sơn River, but they are regarded as one, and both are always mentioned in the same breath. Ban Gioc–Detian Falls rests on the international border between Vietnam and China. The actual drop itself is about 98 feet and is separated into three falls by various trees and giant stones. If you’re able to look at it in person, you will hear the loud thundering effect the water has when it crashes on the cliffs – it can’t be missed.

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Number 5: Pearl Shoal Waterfall, Sichuan Province, China. A beautiful sight indeed, Pearl Shoal Waterfall is located in the northern Sichuan province of China, while the falls themselves rest in Rize Gully. It is incredibly tall, standing at a proud 7,982 feet, with the drop being 131 feet and the fall 1,017 feet wide. The Pearl Shoal acquired its very elegant name from the sparkle effect that the droplets make, resembling pearls as they tumble down the shoal and towards the fall. Peal Shoal is a glorious slice of nature in the Sichuan Province that encompasses forests, pretty blue lakes and the snow-topped mountains.

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Number 4: Sutherland Falls, Milford Sound, New Zealand. Any trip to New Zealand should include a stop at Sutherland Falls – after you’re done searching for Peter Jackson or hobbits, that is. This is very much a high volume waterfall, and the concentration of waterfalls in New Zealand quite high overall. Sutherland Falls is named for Donald Sutherland, a prospector who found the falls in 1880. The three falls are among the highest in the world, and the total drop is 1,904 ft. The upper cascade is 815 feet, the middle cascade is 751 feet, and the lowest cascade is 338 feet.

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Number 3: Niagara Falls, Niagara Gorge, Ontario, Canada. Of course, the waterfall that most people are probably familiar with is Niagara Falls. An easy way down into the gorge would be to stop at the “White Water Walk” and step onto the elevator, riding it to the bottom of the gorge. This is perfectly acceptable if you do not have a lot of time to spare, but for the best experience, a hike down into the gorge is the best way to witness the massive waterfall. A little over two miles north of the White Water Walk, you can step into the “Niagara Glen” gorge trail and prepare for another hike down to the river to take a gander at the Whirlpool with easy access.

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Number 2: Gullfoss, Hvítá River, Iceland. This is easily the most popular waterfall in Iceland and maybe in the world. The total drop for this fall is said to be around 105 feet. Some may be surprised that this waterfall still exists, due to certain various parties’ need for hydroelectricity and wanting to take the land and turn it into something else. Fortunately, those plans turned out to be unsuccessful. Gullfoss was sold to the state of Iceland and has been in good hands ever since.

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Number 1: Victoria Falls, Zambezi River. This is one destination on your waterfalls trip that you definitely do not want to miss. Victoria Falls is regarded as the largest waterfall on the planet, residing in Southern Africa. A Scottish gentleman by the name of David Livingston stumbled upon the falls some time around 1855, and he chose to name them after Queen Victoria. The Zambezi River is also the planet’s largest sheet of pouring water. How have other people enjoyed their time here? Walking trails, riverboarding, kayaking, skydiving, jet-boating – you name it, it’s been done. It would not at all be surprising to find out that the Point Break remake crew spent some time here during filming.

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