Iggy Azalea ft. MØ: ‘Beg For It’ Single Review


Having already teamed up with the likes of Charli XCX (“Fancy”) and Rita Ora (“Black Widow”), Iggy Azalea enlists Danish popstress MØ for her single “Beg For It”. Lifted off Azalea’s reissue of the multi-platinum selling album The New Classic: Reclassified, the single is the first of three additional features.

In a similar vein to last summer’s super smash hit “Fancy,” “Beg For It” is another Hip-Hop/Pop crossover which sees Iggy rap as MØ’s sugary vocals adorn the hook. As with both of Iggy’s hits over the past few months, “Beg For It” comprises of an infectiously catchy chorus in “Imma make you, Imma make you beg for it”: a formula which seems to be working for the Australian rapper.

MØ’s contribution to the single serves its purpose: her powerful voice shines through the persistent Hip-Hop beat which pounds and thumps its way across the soundscape. That, coupled with Azalea’s animated flow really seem to work; blowing off any concerns or questions regarding the odd and unexpected pairing. It’s during Iggy’s final verse however, where we find the track’s defining moment. Azalea changes her delivery style to one similar (or arguably identical) to Miley Cyrus’ guest verse on will.i.am’s “Feelin’ Myself” and that small touch, really brings light to the track’s playfulness.

Despite all this, “Beg For It” does have its issues. When Iggy Azalea first burst onto the scene with her fiery debut single, “Work,” it was the ferocity, coupled with her honest and upfront songwriting, that struck a chord with fans. But with “Beg For It,” Azalea seems to have lost that fire; that passion to speak from the heart. The instrumentation also lacks colour, and is slightly underwhelming. Apart from a few clicks and hand claps, the beat remains the same and doesn’t really capture or excite like her previous releases.

There are moments in the song where the candle burns bright: “This ain’t no accident, I’m killing them on purpose / I-G-G-Y, think she just had to do it better” she intones in the opening verse, but to no avail, as they’re drowned out by a flood of bland phrases and fillers “High price, but I’m worth it, baby / Can’t play with ya, I’ve been busy working’, baby.”

As a result, it feels as if Azalea is trying to recreate the success she had with “Fancy.” While the single will appease and excite, you can’t help but feel like the formula is finally, starting to burn out.