North Korea: 11 Things You Didn’t Know (Part 2)

bbc.co.uk
bbc.co.uk

We already brought you part one of our list of 11 things you didn’t know about North Korea, and now we’re back with part two! Check out six more fascinating facts about North Korea that you definitely (probably) did not know below. You might be surprised by what you learn!

Number Six: James Franco Is on Kim Jong-un’s Bad Side. After the release of The Interview, which stars James Franco and Seth Rogen and is an obvious parody of North Korea, Kim Jong-un effectively banned the film in North Korea. However, one man in South Korea was so determined to get the film inside North Korea’s borders that he ballooned thousands of copies of the film across the border.

Number Five: Their Elections Include Only One Candidate. The official name of North Korea is The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, but in order to call it that, the country must hold elections every five years. They do hold elections; however, only one name is ever on the ballot, and it is mandatory that the country’s citizens vote.

Number Four: Their “Labor” Camps Are Really Death Camps. Many testimonies have confirmed the suspicion that North Korea’s “labor” camps are really death camps. The prison camps are eerily similar to Holocaust death camps, and prisoners there are malnourished, beaten, tortured, and overworked.

Number Three: If You Violate the Law, Expect Your Entire Family to Be Punished. People are sent to the prison camps for many reasons, but the main one is for violating the law or going against the regime. However, if one person violates the law, then three generations of that person’s family will be sent to labor camps. The regime believes that the beliefs of one person may spread throughout his or her entire family, so the entire family is punished.

Number Two: They Built a Ghost Town on Purpose. In the 1950s, Kijong-Dong was built as a way to attract people to come to North Korea. However, Kijong-Dong is actually just a ghost town. The town is visible from the border, and its blue roofs make it visually appealing, but nobody actually lives there.

Number One: Tourists Can See Kim Jong-il’s Body. Though tourism in North Korea is highly calculated, visitors can go see Kim Jong-il’s body preserved in a glass case within a mausoleum.

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