Dolphin Facts: 15 Things You Didn’t Know (Part 2)

Based on the first part of this list, you probably learned that there is a lot about the dolphin that you didn’t know. But that was just the beginning of interesting, unknown dolphin facts. Here in part two, we’ll get even more in depth.

Number Eight: They Have Active Social Lives. They are known to be playful, both with human beings and with each other. They also live in groups of the same dolphins and hunt together as well as play together. Pods of dolphins can have more than 1,000 individuals.

Number Seven: Gestation Takes a While. It can last between nine to seventeen months, and even after that, dolphin mothers take very attentive care of their young. They have been known to nestle and cuddle their babies after they’re born.

Number Six: Dolphin Young are Kind of Coddled. They nurse their mothers for up to two years, and calves stay with their mothers for up to eight years. Not as dependent as human beings, maybe, but pretty close.

Number Five: They Have Very, Very Good Eyesight. They’re brains may be somewhat comparable to ours, but their eyes are far superior. They can also hear ten times better than human beings. But they have no sense of smell whatsoever.

Number Four: They Don’t Have Very Many Enemies. And by enemies, we mean predators. The main killer of dolphins is human beings ,though this sometimes happens indirectly through fishing and pollution.

Number Three: Recently, the Yangtze River Dolphin Went Extinct. Because of the human interference just mentioned, the population of Yangtze River Dolphins officially went down to zero in 2006. The Chinese species died out due to fishing and transportation on the river it lived in.

Number Two: They Give Birth in a Unique Way. It is the only mammal that is known to give birth tail first instead of head first.

Number One: They Have Two Separate Stomachs. One of the stomachs is for storing the food after eating it, and the other is to actually digest the food. This could help explain the surprising 30 pounds of fish that dolphins eat every day.