National Geographic: 15 Things You Didn’t Know (Part 2)

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We already brought you part one of this list of interesting facts about one of the most famous and long-standing magazines in the world, National Geographic. Now we’re back to bring you even more with part two.

Number Eight: They Published Their First Color Photos in 1910

Previous to this, all photos were published in black and white. Hand tinted photos were used in a 1910 edition, depicting the Far East. This revolutionized the quality of the magazine and made them even more popular.

Number Seven: The Magazine Presented a Medal in 1927

Famed for his brave crossing of the Atlantic ocean, National Geographic honored Charles Lindbergh with something called the Hubbard Medal. They offered many different awards later on.

Number Six: The National Geographic Sponsored South Pole Explorers

In 1929, Richard Byrd and three other men became the first explorers to visit the South Pole by aircraft. This amazing feat was supported by the company.

Number Five: The Magazine Supported Jane Goodall

In 1961, the Society sponsored the now well known and highly acclaimed Jane Goodall. Her work with Chimpanzees in Tanzania became a hugely important foundation for animal behavioral studies.

Number Four: ‘Helicopter War in South Vietnam’

In 1962, an article was published featuring the first ever photographs of American soldiers engaged in combat at Vietnam. A monumental event in history.

Number Three: They Released a Copy of the Gospel of Judas

The National Geographic released the only known version of this book in 2006. The information in this text suggests that Jesus could have foreseen certain occurrences which later led to his death.

Number Two: They Debuted the Famous Dog Whisperer

Cesar Millan was featured on the National Geographic Channel. He is a well-known man with his own TV show that involves helping humans better understand their pets.

Number One: National Geographic released ‘The Big Thaw’

In 2007, a photojournalist named James Balog used his art to document and illustrate the rapid speed at which the Earth’s ice is melting. This story was featured as a cover piece. We hope you enjoyed part two of this list of interesting facts about National Geographic Magazine.

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