Wikipedia: 15 Things You Didn’t Know (Part 1)

Wikipedia is one of the largest and most accessible sources of basic information. However, despite the fact that the website has spent a considerable amount of time in the spotlight and under the scrutiny of the public eye, there are still some things that many people don’t know. With that in mind, here we present our list of 15 things you probably didn’t know about Wikipedia. Check out part one below, and stay tuned for part two, coming soon!

Number Fifteen: Wikipedia Is the World’s Seventh Most Popular Website

More people visit the popular website than almost any other website in the world. The six websites that are more popular are Google, Facebook, YouTube, Baidu, Yahoo, and Amazon.

Number Fourteen: Its Name Has Hawaiian Roots

In Hawaiian, “Wiki” is the word for “quick.” The website was designed for users to quickly gain access to basic information, so it makes sense.

Number Thirteen: Its Scientific Articles Are Akin to Britannica’s

It’s true! Some teachers still chide students for using it as a source, but the truth is that a 2005 survey found that Wikipedia’s science articles are as accurate as Britannica’s. And that was over 10 years ago!

Number Twelve: It Has Over 70,000 Editors Around the World

Approximately 73,000 people can call themselves active editors for the site. Even more impressive, Wikipedia has over 22 million accounts with individual users as well.

Number Eleven: Most of the Website’s Servers Are in Virginia

It might sound strange, but it’s true. This means that the website has to follow both federal laws in the United States as well as the state laws in Virginia. Suffice it to say that if the power was to go out in Virginia, Wikipedia would suffer greatly.

Number Ten: It Has No Rules

Rather than rules, the website has five pillars for its readers and editors to follow. These pillars include notes about respect, distribution, and biases.

Number Nine: Vandalized Articles Are Usually Reversed Within Five Minutes

Many people have tried to alter pages as a practical joke, and amazingly, these jokes are generally reversed within a period of five minutes. Stay tuned for part two of our list of 15 things you didn’t know about Wikipedia, coming soon!