Malaria: 15 Things You Should Know (Part 1)

Malaria is a scary disease that is spread by mosquitoes. Although it no longer carries a threat in the United States, it’s still quite the monster. Here are some facts about the disease that people should know.

Number Fifteen: Only Females Spread It

And no, we don’t mean human females. We mean only mosquitoes spread Malaria. This is because its only the females that drink blood, which they do for their eggs.

Number Fourteen It’s the Reason for the CDC

The CDC, which is also known as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, was formed due to the effects of Malaria. The nation was feeling its strong effects and it was important that people find a way to stop it from spreading. It is good that they did this.

Number Thirteen: It’s Italian

The word Malaria itself was formed in Italy. It’s meaning: “bad air”. This, of course, brings to light the fact that the people thought it was caused by another reason. They thought it was caused by swamp fumes instead of mosquitoes. It is interesting how people have a much better understanding of these things now.

Number Twelve: It’s Attacked Presidents

Over the years, multiple presidents have been ailed from this disease. The list is quite long, and includes Washington Abraham Lincoln, and Ulysses S. Grant.

Number Eleven: The United States Got it Unknowingly

Interestingly enough, before 1607, the United States had not been exposed to the virus. It took English colonists to bring it by accident before it was spread on American soil.

Number Ten: Guns, Blood, and Malaria

Malaria was such a force in American history; some people don’t realize how much. In the civil war, for instance, malaria was the cause of death following gun shots and other battle wounds. That is pretty crazy!

Number Nine: It’s Not Gone from the US

Although the disease was pretty much eliminated in the the 1950s, people still contract it. Today, around 1500 people still have to be cured from the illness each and every single year.

There is still much to learn about this disease. Stay tuned for part two, coming soon!