Hollywood: 15 Things You Didn’t Know (Part 1)


When you think of Hollywood, you think of celebrities, awards shows, red carpets and glamour. But there is much more to the iconic mecca of the movies than that. Keep reading to find out 15 things you didn’t know about California’s most famous district, and stay tuned for part two, coming soon!

Number Fifteen: The Original Sign Read ‘Hollywoodland’

The famous sign, which was put up in 1923, originally read “Hollywoodland”. It cost $21,000 to build and it was studded with 4,000 light bulbs. Each letter was 30 feet wide and 50 feet tall, slightly bigger than the current letters, which are around 40 feet tall.

Number Fourteen: There Was a Giant Dot Under the Sign

Apart from Hollywoodland’s 13 letters, operators also built and installed a giant white dot under the sign, which was 35 ft in diameter and highly illuminated. The sign was a total eye-catcher, particularly for a pre-Vegas, pre-Times Square society where huge, lit up signs were not common at all.

Number Thirteen: The Hollywood Sign Was Meant to Last a Year

The Hollywoodland sign, which was built up as a temporary promotion to sell real estate in the newly established city, was only designed to stand in place for a year and a half (18 months). However, it quickly became a landmark and they decided to keep it, as it was bringing many tourists to the city.

Number Twelve: There Were No Movie Theatres Here until 1910

The cinematic capital of the world didn’t have a single movie theatre until 1910. In fact, movie theatres were banned in the entire district.

Number Eleven: It Stands on an Old Ranch

The place we call Hollywood today used to be a deserted place full of farms and cowboys. In 1887, a woman named Daeida Wilcox, who moved to Los Angeles from Ohio with her husband, purchased a ranch in the area, which she nicknamed “Hollywood”.

Number Ten: Around 600 Movies Are Filmed in Hollywood

It is roughly estimated that around 550-600 movies are produced and shot in Hollywood every year. However, most of these films are actually filmed somewhere else in the country, as Hollywood is no longer just a neighborhood, but an industry. Additionally, Hollywood is the oldest film industry in the world and the second largest in terms of annual production, after India.

Number Nine: The Sign Was the Site of a Suicide

Actress Peg Entwistle climbed up the Hollywood sign on September 18th, 1932 and jumped into the mountain. A suicide note was found inside her purse by a witness. Some people still believe the site to be haunted by Entwistle’s presence.

Number Eight: World’s First Circular Office

Hollywood’s Capital Records Building, also known as Capital Records Tower, was the first circular edifice ever built in the world, in 1955. The design was meant to resemble a stack of records on a turntable. Stay tuned for part two, coming soon!