Firefly Facts: 15 Things You Didn’t Know (Part 2)

We already brought you part one of our series on the firefly. Since there is so much more to learn about this delightful animal, here are few more facts.

Number Eight: The Firefly Does Not Like California

For some reason, you will not find fireflies past the Rocky Mountains. There is really no known reason, but the flashing yellow lights stop once you get beyond the mountain range.

Number Seven: European Fireflies May Not Fly

With the word fly in their name, you would think that all fireflies would fly. That is not so in Europe for the female firefly. Females will take on the body of a worm once they reach adulthood but they will still glow.

Number Six: The Babies Can Be Somewhat Violent

As harmless as they are, it is hard to imagine fireflies bothering anything, let alone killing them. But Fireflies in the larvae stage will sometimes stalk a snail’s slime trail and then bite and eat them.

Number Five: Fireflies Have Health Benefits

Who would have thought that the firefly could be used in medicine? Apparently it can. Scientists have found that the luciferase or oxidative enzymes a firefly produces can help detect things like blood clots, or the effectiveness of cancer medications.

Number Four: They Are Nocturnal

Since the firefly does most of its work at night, it makes sense that it sleeps during the day. But there are the rare species who do stay awake during the day.

Number Three: They Do Not Like The Cold

Once summer is over, so is the mating season. And once that is over, most fireflies decide to hibernate for the winter. They either build underground burrows or bury themselves under tree bark for the season.

Number Two: Pennsylvania Seems To Especially Like Them

Pennsylvania tends to have harsh winters, but its springs and summers are the perfect climates for fireflies. The state seems to have taken a special liking to the insect, it chose fireflies as its state insect.

Number One: They Are A Tourist Attraction

Finding fireflies in the backyard is fun enough, but imagine seeing them on a grander stage. During the first week of June, people travel to the Smoky Mountains in Tennessee and the Congaree National Park in South Carolina just to see fireflies in action. Thanks for reading our pieces on the firefly!