Binge Eating Disorder: 15 Things You Didn’t Know (Part 1)

medscape.com
medscape.com

Binge eating disorder affects between 4 and 9 million people in America, making it more common than HIV, Schizophrenia, and other disorders such as anorexia. Here are some facts you didn’t know about this problem.

Number Fifteen: It’s Similar to Bulimia

Bulimia and BED share common qualities, such as a psychologically unstable outlook toward food, and the habit of binge eating. The difference is that BED sufferers do not feel the compulsive need to purge.

Number Fourteen: You Can’t Tell by Looking at Someone That They Have Binge Eating Disorder

The stereotypes say that a lot of fat people have this, or that someone who has this disorder must be obese, but that’s not the case. People with this problem can be a bit overweight, very overweight, or look completely healthy.

Number Thirteen: It Became Formally Recognized Fairly Recently

It wasn’t until 2013 that BED was given a formal diagnosis as a real disorder. This means that a lot of false assumptions about it were prevalent prior to this and that sufferers now have a better chance of getting the help they need.

Number Twelve: Binge Eating Occurs Mostly at Night

People who suffer from this problem tend to restrict their food intake a lot during the day, trying to control the problem and hold themselves back. For this reason, the activity usually occurs at night.

Number Eleven: High Stress Is a Correlation

Studies done in 2006 have shown that people with this disorder have experienced a huge amount of stress, typically in the year prior to the symptoms showing up. The events were found to most typically by interpersonal in nature. BED usually happens as a coping mechanism.

Number Ten: Shame and Anxiety Eating in Front of Others

This is another common factor shared with anorexia or bulimia; BED sufferers hate to eat in front of other people and tend to get really uncomfortable. This is because they feel as though others are judging how much they eat.

Number Nine: Binge Eating Releases Dopamine

This is the pleasure chemical that makes cocaine and heroin so dangerous, and it’s what your brain is flooding with when you binge eat. This is why the behavior can be so addictive. We hope you found part one of this list informative. Check back soon for part two.

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