Caesar Salad: 15 Fun Facts You Never Know (Part 2)

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We really shocked you with our first set of seven fun facts about Caesar salad in our part one article, and now we have returned to give you the full scoop! If you were surprised by the truth about this beloved dish, just wait until you get a look at our part two article! Read on to discover the top eight fun facts that you never knew about the Caesar salad!

Number Eight: Caesar Salad Day

As you (hopefully) read in our previous article, the Fourth of July was the day that this salad style was cultivated. Therefore, it shouldn’t surprise you that this exciting holiday is considered to be National Caesar Salad Day.

Number Seven: The Record-Breaking Salad

If you were to embark on a journey to create the world’s biggest Caesar salad, you have a tough record to be. Holding the city’s roots in creating the dish, this record was accomplished in 2007 in the Mexican city of Tijuana. The end product was a two-ton salad that filled a bowl with a 60-meter diameter.

Number Six: Growing the Romaine Industry

The cultivation of the Caesar salad is one of the main factors that popularized the use of Romaine lettuce in salad. For most of American history, iceberg lettuce was considered to be king. However, after Caesar’s creation caught on in the 1970s, the health benefits and culinary possibilities for this produce were finally recognized.

Number Five: Finding a Use for Utensils

Not many people are aware of this little factoid, but the Caesar was originally introduced as a finger-food. It is traditional to serve the dish with the lettuce leaves un-chopped, because people would initially consume the leaves by simply picking them up. A chopped version of the salad began to appear after the wife of Prince Edward VIII, Wallis Warfield Simpson, refused to follow suit. She vastly disapproved of touching her food with her fingers, and was the first person to dine on the dish by daintily cutting the leaves with a knife and fork.

Number Four: Becoming a Meal

The introduction of the Caesar and Cobb salads revolutionized the art of salads. Before the 1920s, salads were never considered to be a “meal”. Rather, they were only components that were added as a side dish to a main component. The Cobb and Caesar salads were the first to introduce the concept that a large salad could be a full meal.

Number Three: Traditional Serving

Although we don’t experience this luxury much in American, the traditional serving of this dish involves a tableside preparation. In Mexico, it is more common to see trained chefs approach your dinner table with a special cart, and toss the dish before your very eyes. This serving approach was too ensure the maximum quality freshness of the finished product.

Number Two: Raw Egg?

Admittedly, the fear of contracting salmonella from this raw egg-based dish has deterred many diners from the classic versions of this dish. However, the issue should be cause for much worry. Thanks to the acidity of the lemon juice, salmonella isn’t a huge risk of the salad.

Number One: Tijuana was a Haven

It might be hard to believe that this dish was created in Mexico, but Chef Cardini was American before his uprooting. The laws of prohibition hit this chef harder than most, and caused his to take his California restaurant to Tijuana. There, he could embrace his culinary belief that a good meal starts with cocktails and is accompanied by good wine. Unable to do this in America, he sought of the haven of Tijuana. We hope you enjoyed our list of the 15 fun facts you didn’t know about Caesar Salad.

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