Lost: 15 Things You Didn’t Know (Part 1)

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Lost completely changed the TV landscape when it debuted in 2004. For the next six years, the unique series would keep audiences hooked on impossible storylines and themes such as mythology, philosophy, love triangles (and squares), fate, religion, reincarnation, time-traveling, and large doses of mystery. Many TV productions have tried to accomplish what Lost achieved, but it’s proved to be impossible. Lost is, simply, one of a kind. Stay tuned for part two, coming soon!

Number Fifteen: The Mathematical Formulas Are Real

The formulas written on Ms. Hawkin’s chalkboard on season five’s episode titled “The Lie” were all real. Production designer Zack Grobler hired his wife Kristina and his sister-in-law, both physicists, to come up with the real equations. They pinpointed the island’s location by “calculating magnetic anomalies around the globe—so that it may be predicted at which point the flight path of the plane might intersect with the position of the island. The calculations even take the Coriolis effect into account, which is caused by the earth’s rotation.”

Number Fourteen: The Plane Was Also Real

The production team purchased a retired Lockheed L-1011—which used to belong to Delta Airlines—broke it up into several pieces and shipped it to Hawaii. Once in Hawaii, the plane was ‘rebuilt’ and placed on the beach. Lost’s pilot episode was the most expensive ever filmed at the time, with an estimated cost of $10 to $14 million, which resulted in ABC’s chairman Lloyd Braun to be fired from his position.

Number Thirteen: They Had to Rebuild the Pilot Set Again

Season three episode “Exposé”  focuses on a newly-introduced pair of characters, Nikki and Paulo. Through a series of flashbacks, the pilot episode is relived all over again, this time with Nikki and Paulo as protagonists. In order to do this, the production team had to bring all plane pieces back to the beach and place them in the same exact location where they were in the first episode. The engine explosion had to be shot again as well. Despite all the efforts, “Exposé” remains one of the most hated episodes in the series by the fans.

Number Twelve: Real Life Locke and Cooper

John Locke was a very influential English philosopher in the Age of the Enlightenment. The show creators went even further in their philosophical references by naming Locke’s dad Cooper. Real-Life-Locke was patronized by Anthony Ashley Cooper, and he even saved Cooper’s life, just like it happens in the show.

Number Eleven: Cast Away Inspired Lost

Lloyd Braun was inspired to create Lost after watching Cast Away. He thought that a group of people stranded on a deserted island after a plane crash would make for a great TV show concept. After a couple of failed attempts, Braun hired J.J. Abrams to write the final pilot script. Abrams suggested that “the island has to be a character in the show, and something’s wrong with the island,” and that’s how Lost was born.

Number Ten: Jack Was Meant to Die in the Pilot

Jack Shephard was written as a very temporary character, actually meant to get killed by the smoke monster on the very first episode. In fact, Michael Keaton was originally cast to play the part (as a guest appearance.) ABC president Stephen McPherson demanded Jack remain alive, insisting that audiences would feel betrayed if the main character got killed off so early on in the show. Keaton did not want to commit to a regular series, so Matthew Fox was hired instead.

Number Nine: ‘There’s No Place Like Home’ Had Two Alternative Endings

“There’s No Place Like Home, Part 3” concluded with an image of John Locke inside a coffin. Two alternative endings were filmed with Sawyer and Desmond replacing John in the coffin. This was done as a way to decrease the risk of the real finale being leaked. However, the team forgot to tell the actors about it, and Josh Holloway thought his character had actually been killed off!

Number Eight: Kate Was Supposed to be the Leader

During development of the show, Abrams wrote Kate to become the leader after Jack’s death. She was written as a slightly older, very nice, likeable woman with Rose’s backstory. Once Jack was kept, Kate’s story was changed and she was given her current criminal background. Stay tuned for part two, coming soon!

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