Simon Bolivar: 15 Things You Didn’t Know (Part 2)

Simon Bolivar is one of the most famous names in South American history. We already brought you part one of this list of lesser-known facts about the man, and now we’re back with part two.

Number Eight: A Woman Named Manuela Saenz Saved His Life

One night in Bogota, several assassins were sent to murder Simon. Saenz helped him escape them, and became a somewhat long-term girlfriend though he left her behind eventually and had several other mistresses while they were together.

Number Seven: The Best Friend of Simon Bolivar Became His Enemy

A general who fought alongside Bolivar, Francisco de Paula Santander, became Simon’s vice president at one time, and the two were close friends. They had a falling out later on when they realized how much their political opinions differed.

Number Six: He Survived Many Assassination Attempts

This man managed to fight hundreds of battles without receiving a single serious injury on the battlefield. He also managed to escape unscathed from multiple murder attempts.

Number Five: Simon Bolivar Was a Brilliant Strategist

The general was known for his unconventional methods of battle. Instead of taking things slow and steady or going the safe route, they often rushed forward and conquered, taking cities before the Spanish even knew what hit them.

Number Four: He Lost Some Battles, Too

Although wildly successful in most of his pursuits, he wasn’t invincible and lost occasionally. One of his defeats even led to the collapse of the Second Republic of Venezuela in 1814.

Number Three: Dictator Tendencies

Although he believed strongly in independence for nations in South America and fought tirelessly to achieve this, he also thought a firm hand was necessary to control the nations. This made him unpopular among some.

Number Two: Some Speculate That He Was Murdered

Simon Bolivar died in 1830 when he was just 47 years old, of tuberculosis. However, some people have suspected that he was murdered since arsenic was found in his system after death. Others say this was a common medicine used at the time.

Number One: To This Day, People Argue About His Legacy

Politicians and present day leaders still fight over Bolivar’s legacy, and who is the rightful heir to it. We hope you enjoyed part two of our list.