Orbitz: 10 Fascinating Facts You Didn’t Know

orbitz.com
orbitz.com

Orbitz is one of the most well-known and highly regarded travel search engines that currently exists. However, despite the fact that it has spent a considerable amount of time in the spotlight and under the scrutiny of the public eye, there are still some things that many people don’t know. With that in mind, here we present our list of 10 things you probably didn’t know about Orbitz. Well, what are you waiting for? Check it out for yourself below!

Number Ten: Orbitz Forced Competing Airlines to Band Together

The company was started by several airlines as a response to the growing popularity of sites like Travelocity and Expedia. The airlines that grouped together to create the company include Continental, Delta, Northwest, United, and American.

Number Nine: The Travelocity Terminator

When the company was in its infancy, it had a code name, T2. Allegedly, T2 stood for “Travelocity Terminator,” although this was never officially established.

Number Eight: It Provides the Largest Selection of Web-Only Fares

It’s true! Though the website has stiff competition and was recently acquired by Expedia, the fact remains that it’s still a very big deal. There are more than 19 million registered users of Orbitz, and the website offers its users two billion different airfares on 455 different airlines.

Number Seven: It Sold $3.3 Million on Its First Day

When the website officially opened to the public in June 2001, people went nuts over it. In fact, at the end of the day, people had spent a whopping $3.3 million on flight tickets.

Number Six: Its Search Engine Was Designed by MIT Experts

Orbitz initially marketed itself by saying it had an especially fast search engine, setting it apart from the competition. Its search engine was designed at MIT; however, it wasn’t without its initial glitches.

Number Five: It Was Delayed by 9/11

September 11, 2001, was devastating for many reasons and had a negative effect on airline and airline-related sales. Orbitz went public in 2003, but if not for 9/11, it may have gone public a year or more earlier.

Number Four: Expedia’s Acquisition of Orbitz Won’t Affect Consumers

The company was recently acquired by Expedia, and some consumers have grown concerned that fewer sites like this mean the companies will raise prices of flights. However, this isn’t exactly the case. In fact, the acquisition will affect consumers very little, mostly because there are so many travel and flight-related resources.

Number Three: Regular Travelers Should Sign Up for Orbitz Rewards

The company’s rewards program is designed to help people who travel on a regular basis save money. The program’s members can get perks at hotels for staying in hotels for just four nights out of the year.

Number Two: It Sued the 22-Year-Old Founder of Skiplagged

Skiplagged is another popular flight search engine. Orbitz and United Airlines sued 22-year-old Aktarer Zaman and founder of Skiplagged over an alleged revenue loss as a result of Skiplagged, which focuses on finding cheap “hidden city” ticketing. They lost the suit.

Number One: The Importance of Orbucks

The company’s Best Price Guarantee program states that users who book a flight but find a cheaper one within 24 hours will be refunded the difference and awarded $50 “Orbucks” (the currency associated with their rewards program). Users who book a hotel and find a cheaper one up to two days before the check-in date will also have the difference refunded and receive $50 Orbucks. Thanks for reading!

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