The Rolling Stones: Top 9 Most Memorable Lyrics

FLCLcrona64 via DevianArt
FLCLcrona64 via DevianArt

The Rolling Stones are a band that have been around forever. Surviving drugs, fires, electrocution, more drugs, alcohol and palm trees, (that’s just Keith Richards), the Rolling Stones are still going strong! With epic tours around the globe and a mid-70s Mick Jagger still swinging those hips, The Rolling Stones still continue to make great music. So to celebrate their success, here are 9 of their most memorable lyrics.

Number Nine: ‘Angie, Angie, where will it lead us from here / Oh Angie, don’t you weep / All your kisses still taste sweet’

Not ones for being sentimental, The Rolling Stones did just that with “Angie,” nicely backed up by an acoustic guitar. However, although enjoyable to listen to the subject was said to be a plea from Mick Jagger to David Bowie’s wife after she allegedly caught the two in bed together. Saucy.

Number Eight: ‘I’ll never be your beast of burden / My back is broad but it’s a hurting / All I want is for you to make love to me’

Soulful, stimulating and damn right sensual this sexy slow jam certainly puts the swagger into Jagger. Sounding like it came straight from the Deep South in the good ol’ USA, it is crazy to comprehend how three British lads managed to achieve such a dirty mucky sound with “Beast of Burden.”

Number Seven: The Rolling Stones Classic – ‘I see a red door and I want it painted black / No colors anymore, I want them to turn black’

Probably one of the most famous introductions to a song ever, “Paint It Black” is instantly recognizable. From its poetic lyrics to its itchy guitar riff, it bangs and thumps like an overexcited gorilla. A classic from the get go.

Number Six: ‘I was born in a crossfire hurricane and howled at my Ma in the driving rain / But it’s all right now, in fact it’s a gas / But it’s all right / I’m Jumpin’ Jack Flash, It’s a gas, gas, gas’

Inspiring movies, characters and numerous covers, “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” was named after Keith Richards’s gardener, Jack. Again with a notable riff and bassy bluesy vibe, the song is obviously influenced by those across the pond, jam-packed with Americanisms and stateside slang.

Number Five: ‘Brown Sugar, how come you taste so good / Brown Sugar, just like a young girl should’

Controversial yet extremely memorable, “Brown Sugar” sparked off the 70s, fittingly arriving on the Stones’ masterpiece Sticky Fingers. The context of the song, however, is highly debated – is it a girl? Or the dirty brown stuff, heroin? Whatever the subject, you can’t deny the sound with groovy undertones and a pitch perfect Jagger.

Number Four: ‘Rape, murder, It’s just a shot away’

Just like most Rolling Stone records the riff is instantly recognizable with the first couple of seconds becoming the most familiar sound in rock history. Inspired by the Vietnam War and the extreme violence depicted on televisions everywhere, Keith Richards wrote “Gimme Shelter” whilst Jagger was away filming. Combining the vocals of Mick and female vocalist Mary Clayton, the two voices create a ghost-like undertone so powerful it shocked even the hardest of us.

Number Three: ‘You can’t always get what you want / But if you try sometime you find / You get what you need’

With a slightly different tone from their usual filth, the Rolling Stones go all in with a hired choir to boot on “You Can’t Always Get What You Want.” Probably as high up there as their most memorable record, the song confronts themes head on, such as politics, love and the ever popular drugs.

Number Two: ‘Please allow me to introduce myself / I’m a man of wealth and taste….’

Written from the devil’s point of view in first-person, “Sympathy for the Devil” is so darn clever it’s like a history lesson in four minutes. Recounting the evils that have been committed throughout time, The Stones stray away from the sultry blues and fire off the Samba, creating a swingy sound in great contrast to the dark subject matter. Mesmerizing.

Number One: ‘I can’t get no satisfaction, I can’t get no satisfaction / Cause I try and I try and I try and I try / I can’t get no, I can’t get no’

By far holding the title of the most famous riff in the history of rock, “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” is so insanely cool that for those three minutes and 44 seconds you suddenly feel invincible. Becoming their first global hit, the song was again controversial due to its racy and lewd lyrics. Absolutely flawless. Thanks for reading!

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