The Top 10 Shocking Traditions From Around the World

You might think some of your culture’s traditions are strange, but some traditions are so bizarre you might not even believe they’re real. Well, believe it; these 10 shocking traditions from around the world will either make you want to travel or stay at home indefinitely. Grab a globe, and check them out below!

Number Ten: Sateré-Mawé Tribe Tradition. Before a boy can become a man in this Amazonian tribe, he has to wear gloves. But these aren’t just any gloves – the gloves are filled with bullet ants. One sting from a bullet ant is up to 30 times worse than a bee sting. The boys must wear these gloves for 10 minutes, and they must repeat this ritual 20 times over the course of a day.

Number Nine: Kanamara Matsuri. On the first Sunday of April every year, the Japanese host a festival called Kanamara Matsuri to celebrate fertility. Also known as the penis festival, it has become somewhat of a tourist attraction, as attendees can enjoy penis candles, penis food, and Elizabeth, a giant pink penis.

Number Eight: Bride Kidnapping. This practice is seen in Romani communities around the world. If a Romani man likes a certain woman, he simply kidnaps her. If he is able to keep her for three days without her escaping, she “officially” becomes his wife. It is also known as marriage by abduction.

Number Seven: La Tomatina. This is an annual tomato fight in Spain that occurs in the last Wednesday in August every year. To begin this food fight, a giant, greased pole with a ham on top is presented. When someone climbs to the top of the pole and knocks the ham off, the tomato fight begins.

Number Six: Baby Throwing. For the past 500 years, Indians have been throwing babies out of windows. The tradition is supposed to bring luck to the baby, and most babies are younger than two years old when they are thrown. Though the babies are thrown down onto a cloth held below, it is still an incredibly dangerous practice.

Number Five: The Walking Dead. The Toraja people of Indonesia have an interesting way of dealing with funerals. If a family does not have enough money for a proper burial, they wrap the body in gauze, place it in a temporary coffin, and bring it to their home until they have enough money for a proper burial. When they do have enough money, the corpse is unwrapped from its temporary coffin and physically walked to its new burial spot.

Number Four: Finger Amputation. Another Indonesian tribe deals with death in an interesting way – by amputating their fingers. No, not the fingers of the deceased – their own fingers. It is a way to display physically the grief they’re experiencing inside. It is normally the women who do this.

Number Three: Fire Walking. In China, newlywed husbands display their devotion to their bride in an interesting way. Following a wedding ceremony, the husband walks across a bed of hot coals while carrying his wife.

Number Two: Cannibalism of the Dead. One South American tribe decides to deal with death in a very unappetizing way: by eating the dead. The dead bodies are first cremated, and then they are consumed in a soup.

Number One: Man Down. Former Russian leader Peter the Great used to greet every diplomat with a 1.5-liter jug of vodka, and he required the diplomat to consume the vodka before negotiating with them. From this developed the game “Man Down.” The game involves a group of people drinking until they physically can’t anymore, or until someone falls over.