'Ghost Car' In Singapore Appears Seemingly Out Of Nowhere In Traffic, Causing An Accident | PPcorn

‘Ghost Car’ In Singapore Appears Seemingly Out Of Nowhere In Traffic, Causing An Accident

‘Ghost Car’ In Singapore Appears Seemingly Out Of Nowhere In Traffic, Causing An Accident
www.visitsingapore.com

20. The Ghost Car Driver of Singapore

www.telegraph.co.uk

Earlier this year a “ghost car” that seems to appear out of thin air before causing an accident at a busy intersection in Singapore has social media users pretty shaken up. The video recording of the incident has now gone viral and drivers all over the world still have many questions about the mysterious event.

19. Life in Singapore

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Life in Singapore, like most urban lifestyles around the world, means becoming accustomed to the constant sound of traffic and cars throughout day and night. With highrise views in every direction and lights from highways and restaurants, this is truly like a futuristic version of New York City.

18. Driving in Singapore

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Like most people who live in urban environments and large metropolitan cities, the average person doesn’t necessarily drive or own a car. In fact, Singapore is one of the most expensive places in the world to drive and or own a car. But the cost alone doesn’t seem to affect the staggering number of cars that are already on the roads compared to many other metropolitan areas around the world.

17. The Roads of Singapore

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The roads in Singapore are not like the roads of New York City, although you will find plenty of taxi drivers and Uber drivers in Singapore. There is a constant stream of traffic, an almost never-ending flow of cars, taxis, and public transportation vehicles. The roads, like most of Singapore, are very well lit with street lights but also have some of the most extensive coverage by security cameras in the region. This is to catch any suspicious behavior from drivers as well as incidents such as the ghost car incident that happened earlier this year.

16. Car Ownership in Singapore

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With care ownership being something seen as a luxury in the city of Singapore it is interesting to see how the government attempts to handle the explosive growth in car ownership. According to MalayMail Online: “Singapore, among the world’s most expensive places to own a vehicle, will stop adding cars on its roads next year. The government will cut the annual growth rate for cars and motorcycles to zero from 0.25 percent starting in February, the transport regulator said today.” With there being such regulation of vehicle ownership it is interesting that incidents like the ghost car driver still occur.

15. Drivers of Singapore

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Drivers in Singapore assuming they passed all the needed requirements to show they are capable of driving a vehicle then must purchase their right to own and drive within Singapore. According to MalayMail Online: “Singapore requires car owners to buy permits — called Certificates of Entitlement — that allow holders to own their vehicles for 10 years. These permits are limited in supply and auctioned monthly by the government.”

If you ever find yourself driving in Singapore, you’ll be glad you learned the rules.

14. The Rules of the Road

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Driving in Singapore is actually fairly similar to other countries when it comes to the general rules of the road. Although the roads are structured differently than many western countries, there is still a general code of conduct that drivers must follow in order to ensure safety and to prevent mysterious incidents such as the ghost driver incident.

13. Safety in Singapore

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According to the World Health Organization, road traffic injuries caused an estimated 1.25 million deaths worldwide in the year 2010. Low-income countries now have the highest annual road traffic fatality rates, at 24.1 per 100,000, while the rate in high-income countries is lowest, at 9.2 per 100,000. Singapore actually ranks highly as one of the largest cities with the lowest amount of civilian casualties related to driving. Of course, there are still accidents that happen, however.

12. Singapore Streets

www.keithlane.com

Another major difference Singapore has compared to many western cities is the lack of space allocated for roads and transportation. Living in Singapore is very much a verticle lifestyle with buildings stacked on top of each other, unlike western cities that sprawl out with highways for miles. According to MalayMail Online: “Smaller than New York City, land in Singapore is a precious commodity and officials want to ensure the most productive use of the remaining space. Its infrastructure is among the world’s most efficient and the government is investing $28 billion more on rail and bus transportation over the next five years, the regulator said.”

These measures by the government should push more civilians towards using public transportation in hopes of clearing up the roads. With the supernatural element surrounding this incident, many people believe busses won’t help something like this from happening again.

11. Transportation in Singapore

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Public transportation in Singapore is definitely on the rise due to the major push for the government to have more civilians opt for public transport over car ownership. Busses are by far the most common form of transportation in Singapore with Taxis a close second and then driving coming in third.

With public transportation being so popular it led to the roads being packed on that fateful day and many people witnessed the “ghost car” incident.

10. Traffic in Singapore

qz.com

According to Yahoo News: ” In previous surveys done, Singapore ranked ahead of cities such as Hong Kong, London, New York, Paris, and Tokyo in terms of smooth traffic flow, efficient road network, road quality, as well as the public transportation system.” This helps to mitigate the traffic buildup in Singapore quite well especially when one looks at other countries. According to Yahoo News: “Neighbouring countries like Malaysia, Indonesia, and Thailand face severe traffic conditions due to poor infrastructure and vehicle control, so as bad as the traffic in Singapore has become, we are still better off.”

Although by comparison Singapore still comes out on top, there is still a large desire by the public and the government to put more effort in reducing traffic throughout Singapore. The shots from the ghost video we’re about to show you will give you the creeps and may prevent you from driving alone.

9. The Dangers of Driving in Singapore

techcrunch.com

With there being a lot of different drivers on the road, public transport drivers and personal civilian drivers that can still lead to some safety concerns when it comes to driving in Singapore. Although the roads are built with clearly marked lanes and signs that still does not change the simple fact that with more people on the road, the more likely an incident is to occur.

What isn’t so simple is the incident of the ghost car driver that still has government officials and civilians alike, very confused.

8. The Incident

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The entire incident was captured on the dash cams of the cars that were near the incident when it occurred. With all the multiple angles provided, there is still a large amount of confusion around the incident itself. But what actually happened?

7. Coming Out of Nowhere

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The dash camera footage of the incident shows a silver car mysteriously pops into the frame and collides with a white BMW before sliding out of view.“This is really weird. Played a few times and still cannot figure out where the car is from,” Jacky Tong Liang wrote on the Roads.sg Facebook page, where the video was posted and eventually went viral. No one was harmed in the crash, according to the posting. But there are still so many concerns and questions about the ‘ Ghost Car’ itself…

6. The Ghost Car

www.theindependent.sg

The driver of the ‘Ghost car’ or the mysterious silver car featured in the video is still at large and nobody, not even Singapore government officials have come out with the identity of the driver yet. With the Singaporean government being so regulated with driving licenses it is even more unusual that this driver manages to just appear and then vanish without any sort of identity given.

5. Where did that come from?

www.youtube.com

With the video gaining millions of views on YouTube and many other video sharing platforms around the world, there have been many theories put together surrounding the incident. Many video experts think the optical illusion might be the result of uncanny timing and that the turning white car blocks the other car from the camera’s view. Others believe there might have been something a little more supernatural about the incident.

4. What Now?

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With there being so many questions still left unanswered about this mysterious traffic incident there are many civilians asking for more safety and regulations to be put in place to prevent hit and run incidents such as these. Although there will always be hit and runs and accidents there should be a way to identify the drivers involved.

3. The Mystery Continues

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There have been no new leads on who the driver was or who even owned the car involved but the lack of information has not kept civilians or government officials bored with this case.  Dash camera footage is still being analyzed to see if the driver’s plates can be determined and if the driver was even from Singapore.

2. Driver Concerns

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Until then, driving in Singapore continues under an air of caution. The scary part about driving is as safe as a driver can be, that doesn’t protect oneself from the dangers of a potentially reckless driver behind the wheel of another car.

1. Singapore Now

www.theiskandarian.com

Singapore continues to increase surveillance on all its major streets and intersections via security camera as well as encouraging the use of multiple dash cameras on public transportation and taxis. There push for less personal vehicles will also continue over the years to come as Singapore aims to be one of the most public transportation cities in the world.

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